February 17, 2016

2016 Day of Remembrance Taiko Fundraiser

Posted in News, Taiko Festival tagged , , , at 6:54 pm by minidokapilgrimage

Taiko Concert to Benefit Pilgrimage to Minidoka Incarceration Camp in Idaho

Seattle, WA – February 2, 2016

The Minidoka Pilgrimage and Seattle University are proud to present the Day of Remembrance 2016 Taiko Concert on Sunday, February 21, 2016.

The Taiko Concert will feature performances by several renowned taiko groups from the Seattle area. Taiko refers to a traditional Japanese form of percussion using large barrel-shaped drums, dynamic playing styles, and choreographed movements. It is widely popular in Japanese American communities throughout the United States, and increasingly with youth groups.

This year we will feature the “Empty Chair” exhibit, focusing on Japanese who were forced out of Alaska. A total of approximately 200 Alaskan Japanese were affected by Executive Order 9066. The exhibit is based on “The Forced Removal and Resettlement of Juneau’s Japanese Community” exhibit by Juneau-Douglas City Museum, and includes featured photos, artifacts, first-person narratives and documents of eight Juneau families.

This free exhibit will be featured in the Paccar Atrium, located directly outside the auditorium. Other displays will be provided by the Minidoka Pilgrimage, Seattle University, National Park Service and the Minidoka National Historic Site. Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage.

The concert benefits the 14th annual Minidoka Pilgrimage from Seattle, Portland, and across the nation to Minidoka Incarceration Camp in southern Idaho. Minidoka was one of ten camps where Japanese Americans were imprisoned during World War II. Today, it is a unit of the National Park System and is developing into an educational site about civil liberties. The pilgrimage brings together former incarcerees, their families and friends, and those interested in learning more about the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. The pilgrimage offers a unique opportunity to hear and learn directly from those who experienced it firsthand.

The Day of Remembrance marks the 74th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 by Franklin D. Roosevelt which led to the mass incarceration. The Day of Remembrance commemorates the injustices, race prejudice, hardships of 120,000 Japanese Americans who were imprisoned in concentration camps during World War II.

Date:  Sunday, February 21, 2016
Time:  Exhibit hall opens at 12:00pm, Concert begins at 1:00pm
Location: Seattle University – Pigott Auditorium, 901 12th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122
Ticket Price: $20 General Admission. $10 for students with identification.
Ticket Available at:
• Brown Paper tickets at: http://dayofremembrancetaiko2016.bpt.me/ Please bring identification for Will Call tickets, as no actual tickets will be provided.
• International Student Center of Seattle University in the James C. Pigott Pavilion
• Day of show at the Paccar Atrium
Parking: Provided at the Broadway Garage of Seattle University.
Questions: minidokapilgrimage@gmail.com or 206-296-6260
Sponsors: Minidoka Pilgrimage, Seattle University International Student Center

February 19, 2015

2015 Day of Remembrance

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration tagged , , , , , at 6:32 pm by rkozu

redress-logo TN

73 years ago…EO 9066 was signed. Let us never forget. #minidoka#DayofRemembrance

The day Japanese Americans lost their rights

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News tagged , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:15 pm by rkozu

http://seattletimes.com/html/opinion/2025728913_furugoriopedinternment19xml.html

Originally published February 18, 2015 at 6:02 PM | Page modified February 19, 2015 at 12:52 PM

Guest: The day Japanese Americans lost their rights

Gordon Hirabayashi believed the forced removal of 120,000 Japanese Americans was unconstitutional — and he went to prison for his belief, writes guest columnist Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori.

By Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori

Special to The Times

Thursday marks the 73rd anniversary of an American day of infamy. On Feb. 19, 1942, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which set in motion the forced removal of my family from our Auburn-area home, joining the exile of 120,000 Japanese Americans from the West Coast to American concentration camps.

My family was first forcibly removed in crowded, hot trains to Fresno, Calif., arriving at a stark place surrounded by barbed wire fences called Pinedale Assembly Center. A month later, we were transported by bus to the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Northern California.

Conditions were harsh at both locations. Crammed into open ceiling “apartments” no larger than 20 by 25 feet, no conversation or movement was private. Everyone was forced to adjust to a culturally uncomfortable reality of sharing everything from meals in mess halls to humiliating communal showers and latrines with no privacy dividers.

I was just 13, and my family kept me busy playing softball, reading Nancy Drew novels and enjoying music. Looking back, perhaps they wanted to distract me from thinking about my brother, Gordon Hirabayashi, who wasn’t with us. He was in prison.

Before our forced removal, the entire Pacific Coast was under a federally imposed curfew for Japanese Americans. Gordon was attending the University of Washington and he strongly believed that this curfew and Executive Order 9066 were unconstitutional.

Deliberately staying out past the curfew, Gordon turned himself in to police and demanded that he be arrested. The police officers knew Gordon and told him to go home, but he persisted and was arrested by the FBI, tried and found guilty of violating the curfew. With no transportation paid for by the government, Gordon refused to pay his own way to go to prison in Arizona, so he decided to hitchhike.

Gordon also refused to be sent to the concentration camps or serve in the military, spending nearly two years in different prisons while appealing his curfew verdict. Eventually in 1943, his case reached the U.S. Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled against him.

Gordon’s principled stand was both unusual and lonely. Hardly anyone stood up for civil rights in the 1940s like they did in the 1960s, and most people in the Japanese-American community — let alone the nation at large — disagreed with his views as being unpatriotic and criticized him for making things harder by “rocking the boat.”

Forty years after his Supreme Court verdict, the U.S. District Court in Seattle overturned Gordon’s conviction. Blockbuster evidence was uncovered that the federal government deliberately withheld important military documents from his Supreme Court case, disclosing that racial reasons and not military necessity were used to justify the exclusion and incarceration of Japanese Americans.

After the war, Gordon earned his master’s and doctorate degrees in sociology from the University of Washington, enjoyed a successful academic career and received many awards including our nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Among all of his accomplishments, I’m most proud of my brother for his courage to protest the unbridled use of power by our government during times of fear, war hysteria and racial prejudice, and, since Sept. 11, 2001, I suspect that Gordon wouldn’t mind if I added religious intolerance to that list.

Gordon died on Jan. 2, 2012. To ensure that his story lives on and inspires generations to come, our family is honored that the permanent Legacy of Justice installations of public art and interpretive elements will be the cornerstone of the mixed-use Hirabayashi Place project currently under construction in Seattle’s Chinatown International District.

“I never looked at my case as my own, or just as a Japanese-American case,” Gordon said in reference to his overturned conviction. “It is an American case, with principles that affect the fundamental human rights of all Americans.”

Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori is a charter member of the Hirabayashi Place Legacy of Justice Committee.

January 9, 2015

2015 Day of Remembrance Taiko Fundraiser

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News, Taiko Festival tagged , , , , , at 1:46 pm by minidokapilgrimage

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Taiko Concert to Benefit Pilgrimage to Minidoka Incarceration Camp in Idaho
Seattle, WA – January 9, 2015

The Minidoka Pilgrimage and Seattle University are proud to present the Day of Remembrance 2015 Taiko Concert on Sunday, February 15, 2015.

The Taiko Concert will feature performances by several renowned taiko groups from the Seattle area.  Taiko refers to a traditional Japanese form of percussion using large barrel-shaped drums, dynamic playing styles, and choreographed movements. It is widely popular in Japanese American communities throughout the United States, and increasingly with youth groups.

A free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium, located directly outside the auditorium, will include displays about the Minidoka Pilgrimage, Seattle University, National Park Service and the Minidoka National Historic Site, and the Seattle Nisei Veterans Committee/NVC Foundation.  Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage.

The concert benefits the 13th annual Minidoka Pilgrimage from Seattle, Portland, and across the nation to Minidoka Incarceration Camp in southern Idaho. Minidoka was one of ten camps where Japanese Americans were imprisoned during World War II. Today, it is a unit of the National Park System and is developing into an educational site about civil liberties. The pilgrimage brings together former incarcerees, their families and friends, and those interested in learning more about the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.  The pilgrimage offers a unique opportunity to hear and learn directly from those who experienced it firsthand.

The Day of Remembrance marks the 73rd anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 by Franklin D. Roosevelt which led to the mass incarceration.  The Day of Remembrance commemorates the injustices, race prejudice, hardships of 120,000 Japanese Americans who were imprisoned in concentration camps during World War II.

Date:  Sunday, February 15, 2015
Time:  Exhibit hall opens at 1:00pm, Concert begins at 2:00pm
Location: Seattle University – Pigott Auditorium, 901 12th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122
Ticket Price: $20 General Admission
Tickets Available at:

  • Brown Paper tickets at: http://dayofremembrancetaiko2015.bpt.me/ Please bring identification for Will Call tickets, as no actual tickets will be provided.
  • International Student Center of Seattle University in the James C. Pigott Pavilion
  • Day of show at the Paccar Atrium, subject to ticket availability

Parking: Provided at the Broadway Garage of Seattle University.
Questions: minidokapilgrimage@gmail.com or 206-296-6260
Sponsors: Minidoka Pilgrimage, Seattle University International Student Center

 

August 4, 2014

Light on a dark moment in U.S. history: Bainbridge Exclusion Memorial

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Japanese American Incarceration, News tagged , , , , , at 6:12 pm by minidokapilgrimage

http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattlepolitics/2014/08/04/light-on-a-dark-moment-in-u-s-history-the-bainbridge-exclusion-memorial

Light on a dark moment in U.S. history: Bainbridge Exclusion Memorial

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The word “Exclusion” is newly added to the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial, and Rep. Derek Kilmer, D-Wash., is pressing legislation to get it formally recognized by Congress.

The expanded title was observed by Kilmer, along with Japanese Americans interned in World War II, at what the congressman described as a “pretty extraordinary meeting” Monday at the Memorial.

“One thing strikes me, the notion that not all of our history is pretty:  There is value, importance to telling the entire story,” Kilmer said afterward.

“It is a matter of rising every time we fall.  The community here is recognizing, noting a period of time when our nation’s leadership made bad decisions with horrible consequences.”

Kilmer was joined by architect Johnpaul Jones, who designed the memorial and was recently given a National Humanities Medal by President Obama.

On February 19, 1942,  President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order that Japanese-Americans be moved away from the Pacific Coast to often-bleary internment camps in Idaho and Nevada.  The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously upheld the internment.

The human consequences can be seen from 72 year old pictures from Seattle newspapers, notably 227 Japanese Americans crowding onto the dock at Bainbridge Island carrying all that they were allowed to take with them. Bainbridge was the country’s first “exclusion zone.”

An elderly woman named Yukiko Nakamura shed tears at the event on Monday.  The stories told showed instances of nobility such as the neighbors who took over the farm of one Japanese American family, and had profits to turn over when they returned.  Others, most, were left with nothing.

“Some of it was awful to hear, hurting,” Kilmer said.

The binding of wounds has taken years.  The Bainbridge Memorial is one symbol, but there are others.  These include:

–The old 5th Avenue federal courthouse in Seattle was renovated in the last decade, and renamed for William Kenzo Nakamura.  Nakamura went to an internment camp with his family, but enlisted in the U.S. Army.  He was killed in Italy on July 4, 1944, and posthumously voted the Congressional Medal of Honor more than a half-century later.

–At the 4,500-foot level on Mt. Lemmon, just outside Tucson in Arizona, is the Gordon Hirabayashi Campground and Picnic Area.  A University of Washington student from Auburn, Hirabayashi was one of two Seattle-area men who fought internment all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

(Hirabayashi was considered such a threat to national security that he was allowed to hitchhike from Seattle to the Arizona internment camp that is now a campground bearing his name.  He would later have his conviction overturned and was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama.

–Congress voted to compensate surviving internees when it passed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. Seattle’s U.S. Rep. Mike Lowry was a major sponsor of the legislation.  Amazingly, two other prime sponsors — Democratic Rep. Norm Mineta and GOP Sen. Alan Simpson — met each other as young men. Mineta was interned in Wyoming, where Simpson was growing up.

–Mineta became U.S. Secretary of Transportation under President George W. Bush, the first internee to serve in the Cabient.  Two U.S. Senators from Hawaii, Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga, were part of the much-decorated 442nd Regimental Combat Team on the Italian front in World War II.

Walt and Millie Woodward, publisher of the Bainbridge Review, took a tougher stand four decades before all of the sometimes- posthumous honors.  They opposed the removal of Japanese Americans from Bainbridge Island when it was happening.

Once excluded, the internees of World War II went on to do their country proud.  And their country has reason to take pride in them.

Will lawmakers in the other Washington officially put “Exclusion” into the title of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial?

“There are hurdles to getting anything done in Congress,” said Kilmer, in classic understatement.

June 3, 2014

Visitor Center Planned for Minidoka National Historic Site

Posted in Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , , , , at 9:55 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://magicvalley.com/news/local/visitor-center-planned-for-minidoka-national-historic-site/article_feed3a24-e625-11e3-878f-001a4bcf887a.html

Visitor Center Planned for Minidoka National Historic Site

May 28, 2014 1:30 am  •  

EDEN • The Minidoka National Historic Site near Eden was an internment camp established during World War II where approximately 13,000 Japanese-American internees were detained. Now, through the National Park Service, the old Minidoka Relocation Center will be receiving a brand new visitor center to tell the story of the hardships of Japanese-Americans held there.

On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066. The order authorized the Secretary of War to exclude any persons from designated areas as a national security measure. According to Carol Ash, chief of interpretation and education for the National Park Service at Hagerman Fossil Beds and Minidoka, nearly 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry were rounded up along the Pacific Coast following Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and placed into internment camps throughout the country.

In addition to a new staffed visitor center at the site in Eden, some of the camp’s original buildings will be rehabilitated to provide a better perspective of life while imprisoned there. Exhibits detailing the incarceration experience will be built and a public reflection area will also be available where visitors to the site can record their feelings about the camp.

“There were government reports that said they (Japanese-Americans) were no threat to their country during WWII,” Ash said. “After the war was over there was not one single documented case of sabotage by the Nisei, by the Japanese. It truly, truly was a civil liberties issue and that’s what makes these sites so very important.”

Ash also said that an oral history area will be on-site and contain audio of camp internees talking about their experiences. Ash hopes that a new visitor’s center at the site will help better educate and illustrate the importance of remembering what happened. Ash said that plans are moving Planning for the new visitor’s center began in April and it will hopefully completed by 2017, Ash said.

“We call it a site of conscience,” said Ash of the Minidoka site. “Two thirds of those people were American citizens. There was no due process of any kind and they were forcibly removed from their homes.”

The internees were sent to detention centers where they stayed for months until the relocation centers were built. From 1942 to 1945, the internment camps would be home to American citizens because of widespread paranoia following Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

“They spent three years in prison,” Ash said. “With no due process it becomes a civil liberties issue and that’s why it’s so critical that we remember that.”

February 25, 2014

2014 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Taiko Festival, Taiko Festival Pictures tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:52 am by minidokapilgrimage

Thank you to everyone who came out and supported this year’s Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival at Seattle University.  The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee wants to especially thank: UW Taiko Kai, Ringtaro and the School of Taiko, Okinawa Kenjin-Kai, Seattle Matsuri Taiko, Kaze Daiko and Seattle Kokon Taiko for participating in this year’s festival.

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January 28, 2014

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2014 Taiko Fundraiser

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Taiko Festival tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:07 am by minidokapilgrimage

Buy your tickets here at Brown Paper Tickets: 
http://dayofremembrancetaiko.bpt.me

DOR TAIKO 2014_F10Appr

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2014 Taiko Fundraiser

Seattle, WA – December 18, 2013 – In recognition of Japanese American Day of Remembrance and the 72nd anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and Seattle University are proud to present the Day of Remembrance 2014 Taiko Fundraiser on Sunday, February 23, 2014.  The event will open at Noon and the concert featuring taiko groups from throughout the Seattle area will begin at 1:00 p.m. Sunday, February 23rd in the Pigott Building on the campus of Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue in Seattle, WA.  Tickets are $20 general, $10 for students with ID and can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets, http://dayofremembrancetaiko.bpt.me.  Parking is provided at the Broadway Garage of Seattle University.  If attendees purchase tickets through Will Call, no actual tickets will be given, so please make sure to bring identification.  For those unable to purchase tickets on-line, they will be available at the International Student Center of Seattle University in the James C. Pigott Pavilion for Leadership.

A free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium directly outside the auditorium will open at Noon and will feature displays from the Law Library of Seattle University, National Park Service and the Minidoka National Historic Site, and the Seattle Nisei Veterans and Nisei Veterans Foundation.  Also featured will be original photographs in a collection called “My Minidoka” by Johnny Valdez y Uno.  Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

The concert benefits the annual Minidoka Pilgrimage to Twin Falls, Idaho.  This will be the 12th year of the Pilgrimage.  As one of the ten original War Relocation Authority (WRA) camps, the Minidoka National Historic Site is currently a part of the National Park Service and continues to be developed as an educational site.  Currently there is an original Mess Hall and Barrack at the site of Block 22, as well as an original Fire Station, Warehouse and Root Cellar.  Recent improvements include the Honor Roll, dedicated in 2011, which lists the names of approximately 1,000 individuals that enlisted from Minidoka and served in the army and 2014 will include the dedication of a restored guard tower at the entrance area.

The Day of Remembrance recognizes the date, February 19, 1942, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which forced 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents into concentration camps during World War II solely based upon their Japanese descent.

Sponsors of this event include: The International Student Center, the Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, Seattle University and the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

Dale H. Watanabe
watanad@seattleu.edu
Minidoka Pilgrimage Committee/Seattle University

January 14, 2013

2013 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Taiko Festival tagged , , , , , at 10:37 am by minidokapilgrimage

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2013 Taiko Fundraiser

Seattle, WA – January 7, 2013 – In recognition of Japanese American Day of Remembrance and the 71st anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and Seattle University are proud to present this year’s Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival 2013.  It will take place at 1:00 p.m. Sunday, February 17th at the Pigott Building on the campus of Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue in Seattle, WA.  Tickets are $20 general, $10 for students with ID and can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets, http://minidokataiko.brownpapertickets.com/.  If attendees purchase tickets through Will Call, no actual tickets will be given, so please make sure to bring identification.  For those unable to purchase tickets on-line, they will also be available at the JCCCW Office, 511 – 16th Ave. S., 206-568-7114 and at the Seattle University International Student Center.

A special free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium directly outside the auditorium will open at Noon and will feature the  display “Ancestry is not a Crime:  A Tribute to Gordon Hirabayashi” detailing his life and challenge of the incarceration and subsequent Coram Nobis case.  Also featured will be original photographs in a collection called “My Minidoka” by Johnny Valdez y Uno.  Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

The taiko groups that are scheduled to perform are:  Seattle Matsuri Taiko, Inochi Taiko, Kaze Daiko, Ringtaro Tateishi School of Taiko, Seattle Kokon Taiko, Northwest Taiko, One World Taiko, Okinawa Kenjinkai Taiko (OKK), Stadium High School Taiko Club and Tacoma Fuji Taiko.  The program will conclude with a performance of all the groups together on stage.

The concert benefits the annual Minidoka Pilgrimage to Twin Falls, Idaho.  This will be the 11th year of the Pilgrimage.  As one of the ten original War Relocation Authority (WRA) camps, the Minidoka National Historic Site is currently a part of the National Park Service and continues to be developed as an educational site.  Currently there is an original Mess Hall and Barrack at the site of Block 22, as well as an original Fire Station, Warehouse and Root Cellar.  In addition, the Honor Roll listing the names of approximately 1,000 individuals that served in the army from Minidoka was dedicated in 2011.

The Day of Remembrance recognizes the date, February 19, 1942, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which forced 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents into concentration camps during World War II solely based upon their Japanese descent.

Sponsors of this event include: The International Student Center and Office of the President, Seattle University and the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Washington.  Parking at the Broadway Garage at Seattle University is being hosted by the Office of the President.

Contact:
Bif Brigman
bif@jcccw.org
Japanese Cultural & Community Center of Washington
206-568-7114

Dale Watanabe
watanad@seattleu.edu
Minidoka Pilgrimage Committee
206-296-6260

May 18, 2012

2012 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival Pictures

Posted in Taiko Festival Pictures tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 10:55 pm by minidokapilgrimage

Pictures from the 2012 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival held at Seattle University on February 19, 2012 can now be found online.  Please check out the pictures from the Taiko Festival!

2012 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival Pictures

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