November 6, 2014

Seattle woman in famous wartime photo dies

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News tagged , , , , , at 11:31 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/article/Seattle-woman-in-famous-wartime-photo-dies-5874325.php

Seattle woman in famous wartime photo dies

Updated 12:09 pm, Thursday, November 6, 2014
Fumiko Hayashida holds 13-month-old daughter Natalie, while waiting board a ferry from Bainbridge Island to Seattle on March 30, 1942. They were among 227 Japanese Americans forced into interment camps during World War II under Executive Order 9066.  Photo: Seattlepi.com File/MOHAI, -
Fumiko Hayashida holds 13-month-old daughter Natalie, while waiting board a ferry from Bainbridge Island to Seattle on March 30, 1942. They were among 227 Japanese Americans forced into interment camps during World War II under Executive Order 9066. 
Photo: Seattlepi.com File/MOHAI, –

Seventy years ago, Fumiko Hayashida was a face in the crowd, one of 227 Japanese-Americans forced to leave Bainbridge Island during World War II. But as she awaited imprisonment with a baby in her arms, a news photographer took her picture.

That photo would later become an iconic wartime image, propelling Hayashida, then a modest farmer’s wife, into the limelight of civil rights activism.

“She was a nobody, but she was everybody,” said Hayashida’s daughter, K. Natalie Ong. It had been Natalie, then 13 months old, that Hayashida was holding the day their family was exiled.

“She represented everybody and what happened to Japanese-Americans.”

Hayashida died Sunday in Seattle. She was 103.

From farmer’s wife to living icon

Born on Bainbridge Island, Hayashida was the oldest living Japanese-American incarcerated from the island. Because they were near naval bases, the Bainbridge group was the first of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry detained under Executive Order 9066 in the country.

Most were U.S. citizens.

The government gave the Bainbridge group six days’ notice of their March 30, 1942 internment. Then 31 and pregnant, Hayashida wore all the clothes she could; boarded a ferry to Seattle; and then a train to Manzanar, an isolated desert camp in California. She was anxious and scared.

“It’s awful when you don’t know where you’re going, you don’t know long you’re going to stay,” Hayashida told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer in 2009. Her family later went to Minidoka in Idaho, spending a total of about three and half years in camps. She gave birth to her son Leonard. She had three kids under 5 while incarcerated.

When she and husband Saburo returned to Bainbridge, their strawberry fields had gone fallow. Many of their friends never returned to the island. He got a job at Boeing and they moved to Beacon Hill, where Hayashida raised three kids and lived for decades.

It had been a Seattle Post-Intelligencer photographer who took the photo, but a MOHAI staffer who identified her. The archivist had enlarged the photo and was able to read her internment tag.

By that time, Hayashida was an old woman. Her photo appeared in magazines and the Smithsonian. She quickly became a living icon, a survivor of wartime heartbreak.

“She wasn’t a political person, or an activist, but she relished that role,” said Ong, her daughter. “It really added an interesting dimension to her later life.”

‘I had a good life’

In her 90s, Hayashida joined the effort to get federal recognition for a Bainbridge site memorializing the internment. She testified before Congress, rolling down the halls in a wheelchair. At first, she was reluctant.

“She said, ‘Oh no, I can’t speak, I’m an old lady,'” recalled her friend Clarence Moriwaki, who had convinced her to testify.

“She nailed it,” he said. “She said, ‘I’m 95 years old, I’m an old woman, I hope I live long enough to see this memorial be recognized.'”

The Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial, of which Moriwaki is president, is now open to the public.

Earlier this year, Hayashida came out for Bainbridge’s annual New Year’s mochi-pounding festival. Crowds greeted the petite, white-haired centenarian with enthusiasm.

“I think the crowd clapping for her was louder than the taiko drums,” Moriwaki said.

Hayashida was vibrant in old age and didn’t dwell on the past. She preferred instead to root for her beloved Mariners, fill her house with frog figurines and play poker with girlfriends.

“This war was so long ago,” she told the P-I in 2009. “I’m proud of my life. I had a good life, not a perfect one. But nobody’s life is perfect. I have good family and good friends, and I feel so lucky.”

Hayashida is survived by sister Midori Yamasaki; daughter K. Natalie Ong and son Neal Hayashida; grandchildren Dennis Hayashida, Richard Hayashida, Kristine Hayashida Moore, Gary Ong and Paula Ong; five great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by husband Saburo Hayashida and son Leonard Hayashida.

The family has planned a celebration of her life on Nov. 16 in Seattle.

August 4, 2014

Light on a dark moment in U.S. history: Bainbridge Exclusion Memorial

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Japanese American Incarceration, News tagged , , , , , at 6:12 pm by minidokapilgrimage

http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattlepolitics/2014/08/04/light-on-a-dark-moment-in-u-s-history-the-bainbridge-exclusion-memorial

Light on a dark moment in U.S. history: Bainbridge Exclusion Memorial

|

The word “Exclusion” is newly added to the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial, and Rep. Derek Kilmer, D-Wash., is pressing legislation to get it formally recognized by Congress.

The expanded title was observed by Kilmer, along with Japanese Americans interned in World War II, at what the congressman described as a “pretty extraordinary meeting” Monday at the Memorial.

“One thing strikes me, the notion that not all of our history is pretty:  There is value, importance to telling the entire story,” Kilmer said afterward.

“It is a matter of rising every time we fall.  The community here is recognizing, noting a period of time when our nation’s leadership made bad decisions with horrible consequences.”

Kilmer was joined by architect Johnpaul Jones, who designed the memorial and was recently given a National Humanities Medal by President Obama.

On February 19, 1942,  President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order that Japanese-Americans be moved away from the Pacific Coast to often-bleary internment camps in Idaho and Nevada.  The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously upheld the internment.

The human consequences can be seen from 72 year old pictures from Seattle newspapers, notably 227 Japanese Americans crowding onto the dock at Bainbridge Island carrying all that they were allowed to take with them. Bainbridge was the country’s first “exclusion zone.”

An elderly woman named Yukiko Nakamura shed tears at the event on Monday.  The stories told showed instances of nobility such as the neighbors who took over the farm of one Japanese American family, and had profits to turn over when they returned.  Others, most, were left with nothing.

“Some of it was awful to hear, hurting,” Kilmer said.

The binding of wounds has taken years.  The Bainbridge Memorial is one symbol, but there are others.  These include:

–The old 5th Avenue federal courthouse in Seattle was renovated in the last decade, and renamed for William Kenzo Nakamura.  Nakamura went to an internment camp with his family, but enlisted in the U.S. Army.  He was killed in Italy on July 4, 1944, and posthumously voted the Congressional Medal of Honor more than a half-century later.

–At the 4,500-foot level on Mt. Lemmon, just outside Tucson in Arizona, is the Gordon Hirabayashi Campground and Picnic Area.  A University of Washington student from Auburn, Hirabayashi was one of two Seattle-area men who fought internment all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

(Hirabayashi was considered such a threat to national security that he was allowed to hitchhike from Seattle to the Arizona internment camp that is now a campground bearing his name.  He would later have his conviction overturned and was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama.

–Congress voted to compensate surviving internees when it passed the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. Seattle’s U.S. Rep. Mike Lowry was a major sponsor of the legislation.  Amazingly, two other prime sponsors — Democratic Rep. Norm Mineta and GOP Sen. Alan Simpson — met each other as young men. Mineta was interned in Wyoming, where Simpson was growing up.

–Mineta became U.S. Secretary of Transportation under President George W. Bush, the first internee to serve in the Cabient.  Two U.S. Senators from Hawaii, Daniel Inouye and Spark Matsunaga, were part of the much-decorated 442nd Regimental Combat Team on the Italian front in World War II.

Walt and Millie Woodward, publisher of the Bainbridge Review, took a tougher stand four decades before all of the sometimes- posthumous honors.  They opposed the removal of Japanese Americans from Bainbridge Island when it was happening.

Once excluded, the internees of World War II went on to do their country proud.  And their country has reason to take pride in them.

Will lawmakers in the other Washington officially put “Exclusion” into the title of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial?

“There are hurdles to getting anything done in Congress,” said Kilmer, in classic understatement.

June 10, 2014

Minidoka: Memory and Survival Captured in Literary Works

Posted in 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Photos tagged , , , , , , , , at 8:17 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://www.iexaminer.org/2014/06/minidoka-memory-and-survival-captured-in-literary-works/

Minidoka: Memory and survival captured in literary works

STAN SHIKUMA JUNE 9, 2014

Minidoka War Relocation Center, Idaho, USA. Inside the coop store of block 30, 1943. • Photo by U.S. Department of the Interior

In 1942, almost 13,000 people of Japanese ancestry, many of whom were American citizens, were removed from their homes and sent to a desolate incarceration camp near Twin Falls, Idaho. Japanese Americans spent nearly three years incarcerated at Minidoka and other camps during World War II.  Today, the Minidoka site continues to hold a mixture of memories and strong emotions—feelings of denial, distrust, shame, and joy.

 —Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee

The memories won’t die and the legacy lives on in generations that never lived inside the barbed wire of Minidoka. This is due in large part to the work of groups like the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and Friends of Minidoka who continue to raise consciousness around the Japanese American concentration camp experience and the designation of Minidoka as a National Historic Site.

Credit is also due to the work of many authors, scholars, filmmakers, photographers and journalists who continue to research and write about the incarceration and removal, finding new details, new stories, and new connections that help keep the story alive and relevant to the present.

Two such works were recently published. One is a book by photojournalist Teresa Tamura and the other is a compilation of essays edited by historians Russell M. Tremayne and Todd Shallat.


Minidoka

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp
By Teresa Tamura
Caxton Press, 2013

Tamura’s Minidoka chronicles the author’s own journey from a passive state of ignorance and embarrassment about Minidoka to a passionate desire to unearth and illuminate the history of the people and the place. As a photojournalist, she achieves this largely through the photos she takes of people, sites, and artifacts associated with Minidoka and the explanatory captions supplied.

Through her research, well documented in footnotes and bibliography, Tamura reveals several little known facts and provides a clear historic context. The author’s intro and a special essay by Mitsuye Yamada make fascinating reading, but the heart of the book lies in the black and white photographs taken by the author.

Tamura includes many voices in her book, providing us with the photos and perspectives of those who lived or worked in the camp; those who left Minidoka for school, work, the army or prison; those who were actually born in camp; and those who worked to keep the memories alive through organizing, teaching, speaking, writing, art, literature, and poetry. She gives a voice, a name, a face, and a historical backdrop to each portrait.


surviving_minidoka

Surviving Minidoka: The Legacy of WWII Japanese American Incarceration
Russell M. Tremayne and Todd Shallat, editors
Boise State University, 2013

In Surviving Minidoka, editors Tremayne and Shallat preserve 10 “essays and insights from the College of Southern Idaho’s annual Minidoka Civil Liberties Symposium. Contributors, in pictures and words, honor the enduring spirit of nidoto nai yoni: “let it not happen again.” (Tremayne, from An American Tragedy).

The pieces range from historical scholarly works like that of Professor Greg Robinson on Mixing the Races, to personal remembrances from artist Roger Shimomura and the late Frank Kitamoto, to reflections on specific topics or personalities like Anna Hosticka Tamura’s piece on Minidoka Gardens or Russell M. Tremayne’s piece on Nakashima woodworker. Interspersed throughout are poems and excerpts from the writings of Lawrence Matsuda, Mitsuye Yamada, Lawson Fusao Inada, and others.

Like any collection of writings by several authors, the leap from one essay to the next is sometimes wide, both in style and content. Taken as a whole, however, the 10 essays, punctuated with numerous ancillary photos and writings, create a nuanced picture of Minidoka concentration camp and of the social milieu in which it was created: early 20th century America.

Viewed side by side, Minidoka and Surviving Minidoka offer a stark contrast: one in muted black and white with a single narrative and author, the other a busy full-color volume with multiple viewpoints and far-ranging topics. Both, however, are artistically attractive, both apt to kindle some emotional response, each with a unique take on one of America’s ten concentration camps of WWII: Minidoka.

The 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage takes place from June 19 to 22. This 11th pilgrimage will take place with former incarcerees, their families, and friends—from Seattle, Portland and across the nation—to the former Minidoka Camp in Idaho. For more information, visit www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

March 23, 2014

Dr. Frank Kitamoto, 74, Japanese-American leader dies

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , , , at 9:09 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2023194344_kitamotoobit1xml.html

Dr. Frank Kitamoto, 74, Japanese-American leader dies

Dr. Frank Kitamoto, a leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese-American community, who spread awareness about Japanese internment camps, died of kidney and heart complications March 15 at a Seattle hospital. He was 74.

March 22, 2014

By Paige Cornwell
Seattle Times staff reporter

Frank Kitamoto sits next to a plaque at the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.
COURTESY THE KITAMOTO FAMILY, 2008
Frank Kitamoto sits next to a plaque at the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.

When Japanese Americans returned home after being incarcerated in internment camps during World War II, no one wanted to talk about their experiences. It was too painful. They wanted to move on.

Determined to ensure that what his community experienced would never happened again, Frank Kitamoto broke that silence.

Dr. Kitamoto, a dentist, was a leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese-American community, who spread awareness about Japanese internment camps, died March 15 at a Seattle hospital. He was 74.

He died of heart and kidney complications, according to his sister Lilly Kodama, of Bainbridge Island.

Frank Kitamoto was 2½ years old in 1942 when he, his mother and three sisters were sent to the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California after President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. His father had already been rounded up by the FBI for questioning; he joined the family later.

The Japanese Americans on Bainbridge Island were the first group in Washington to be taken to the internment camps, Dr. Kitamoto said during an interview with Idaho Public Television in 2007. The Kitamoto family stayed in Manzanar for 11 months, then they were transferred to Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho.

Dr. Kitamoto’s earliest memories were from the camps, so, he said, he didn’t know what he was missing then. Later, he realized how difficult it must have been for the adults. He remembered spit-wad fights with other children and getting trampled at the end of the Miss Minidoka contest. When he was 5, he stole cigarettes from his dad’s dresser and smoked the whole pack, he told the television interviewer. Afterward, he was sick for a week.

“But I did give up smoking when I was 5 years old,” he said. “I remember that.”

Dr. Kitamoto was 5 when his family returned to Bainbridge Island near the end of the war. He struggled with identity, said Gerald Elfendahl, who met him in the early 1980s when they worked together on an exhibit at the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum, where Elfendahl was the curator.

“After World War II, there was such a strong social pressure for the Japanese to assimilate and not share their culture,” Elfendahl said. “He didn’t think it was good to be Japanese,” Dr. Kitamoto told him.

That changed when Dr. Kitamoto realized the public needed to hear about their experiences, Kodama said. When he tried to interview those who had been interned, some members of the community viewed him as an “angry young man who was rocking the boat,” said Clarence Moriwaki, who met Dr. Kitamoto in 1998 when Dr. Kitamoto was president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community.

“There were 120,000 stories, and all their stories are different, “Moriwaki said. “Some have spent their whole time trying to forget it. Talking about it picks at that scab, and it’s painful. Frank did understand that, but he wanted to make sure that it didn’t happen again.”

Dr. Kitamoto worked with others to create an oral-history project, which he presented to students in Washington and across the nation. When Dr. Kitamoto’s exhibits and the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial were completed, the same men who initially had been opposed came forward, Kodama said.

“They told Frank they were sure glad he didn’t pay any attention to them,” Kodama said.

Dr. Kitamoto had a successful dental practice on Bainbridge Island. In his offices, there were rooms filled with heirlooms donated to him by Japanese-American families. It must have driven his wife, Sharon, crazy, Moriwaki said, but she also recognized how important the items were.

“The artifacts were all over the place, and yet he felt these were important to save,” Moriwaki said. “He knew those pieces weren’t junk, they were somebody’s story.”

In addition to his sister, Lilly, survivors include Dr. Kitamoto’s wife, Sharon, and son Derek, both of Bainbridge Island, and sister Frances Ikegami of Bremerton.

Funeral arrangements are pending.

Paige Cornwell: 206-464-2530 or pcornwell@seattletimes.com

March 18, 2014

Frank Kitamoto, longtime leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American community, passes away

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News tagged , , , , at 9:13 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://www.bainbridgereview.com/news/250672091.html

Frank Kitamoto, longtime leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American community, passes away

Frank Kitamoto, then president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community, gives U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee and U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell a tour of the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial wall in June 2010.   - Brad Camp | Review file

Frank Kitamoto, then president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community, gives U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee and U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell a tour of the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial wall in June 2010. 

— Image Credit: Brad Camp | Review File

Frank Kitamoto, an iconic figure in Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American community, died Saturday, March 15. He was 74.

Kitamoto was a longtime dentist on Bainbridge Island but was better known for his work to preserve and share the history of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.

“He was kind of a giant to me,” said Clarence Moriwaki, who worked closely with Kitamoto as part of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community. “He had been an outspoken champion of human rights. He was my mentor and friend.”

Kitamoto and his family were among the 227 Bainbridge Japanese Americans to be taken from Bainbridge Island on March 30, 1942, and sent to internment camps.

The families from Bainbridge were the first of nearly 12,000 Japanese Washington residents to be taken to concentration camps under President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066. The Kitamotos and other islanders were in the initial wave because government officials feared their proximity to crucial U.S. naval bases in Puget Sound.

They had six days to pack up their lives. At the time, Frank Kitamoto was 2 1/2, and along with his mother, Shigeko, and three sisters, Jane, 9 months old, Frances, 5, and Lilly, 7, were first sent to the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California.

A famous photograph taken during the forced removal shows the family of five — his father had already been taken in by the FBI in early February, 1942 — waiting with their suitcases and Frank holding the one thing he was allowed to carry away, his rubber toy John Deere tractor, before their departure. The family was later moved to the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Jerome County, Idaho.

Kitamoto, who was born May 28, 1939, returned to Bainbridge Island after World War II.

In 1983, Kitamoto started an oral history project on the internment with Ron Nakata and John Sakai, and made repeated visits to classrooms across Washington state and beyond to talk about the history of Japanese Americans.

Plans for a memorial service have not yet been finalized.

“He touched many, many lives; not just on the Island but across the planet, and for kids yet to be born,” said Gerald Elfendahl, who worked with Kitamoto for more than 35 years on history and heritage projects.

“Frank was just a very, very special person,” Elfendahl said.

Moriwaki recalled the slideshow presentation that was put together by Kitamoto that discussed fear and racism. He was in high demand, Moriwaki said, and would travel for anyone who asked, often on his own dime.

For Moriwaki, one slide stuck with him. In it were the words, “The opposite of love isn’t hate, but fear.”

Kitamoto and Moriwaki’s shared passion for human rights is what began the mentorship, but it was Kitamoto’s commitment to sharing his experience while also connecting to others that, Moriwaki said, is what made him a friend.

In one instance, Kitamoto and Moriwaki traveled to visit a Japanese American memorial in Lac Du Bonnet, Canada.

It was Sept. 18, 2001, just a week after Sept. 11, but the two went anyway. They had hours in the car to speak.

“He had the biggest giving heart,” Moriwaki said.

“If you ever wanted to know where Frank was, all you had to do was listen,” Moriwaki said. “You would hear this big, hardy laugh.”

A former president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese Community — an organization he headed for more than 25 years — Kitamoto was named an Island Treasure in 2002 by the Bainbridge Island Arts and Humanities Council.

He was also honored with a Kitsap Human Rights Commissions Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008.

“He’d be the first person to say it’s nice, but it’s not about me. I’m just telling a story about others,” Moriwaki said.

His memories of life in the camps were a bit limited, Kitamoto later acknowledged, because of his young age.

“I remember playing in the sand around the barracks. I remember my cousin liking to eat sand and I don’t really know why but she always ate sand,” he said in an interview with Jim Peck for “The Idaho Homefront: Of Camps and Combat,” a program for Idaho Public Television.

“I was always getting into trouble. Memorable things – I know I took a pack of cigarettes from my dad’s dresser once and went into the barrack and smoked the whole pack and I was really sick for maybe a week or so but I did give up smoking when I was 5 years old. I remember that,” he said.

“I remember going to a Miss Minidoka contest and sitting in the front row and when the winner was announced everybody surged forward and trampled me into the gravel so I ended up in the hospital. That’s where they picked gravel out of me … I remember the older kids having ping-pong. I mean, having spit wad fights with rubber bands and paper that they rolled up into spit wads and they would tip the ping-pong tables over and shoot at each other and when they were out of ammunition they had us little kids run out there and pick up all the ammunition for the next round.”

This month, Bainbridge will commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the first forced removal of Japanese Americans in World War II at the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.

Without Kitamoto there, Moriwaki said the ceremony will take on a very different tone.

“It’s a hole, a huge hole for the Japanese American community,” Moriwaki said.

March 16, 2014

Remembering Dr. Frank Kitamoto

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , at 10:00 am by minidokapilgrimage

IMG_7505

It is with great sadness that we share that we lost one of our committee members, Dr. Frank Kitamoto on March 15, 2014.  Frank was a young toddler when he, along with his family, were sent to Minidoka during World War II.  He shared the lessons of the incarcerations to: various school groups, community organizations, friends and just anyone who was willing to listen.  Frank was active not just on the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee, but also on the Friends of Minidoka Board and as President of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community Executive Board to just name a few.  He will be remembered for his relentless spirit and energy; and his never-ending passion for civil rights.  Frank, we thank you for your dedication to us and for all the work you did with the incarceration experience and sharing your story.  We will miss you greatly. Nidoto Nai Yoni

IMG_2488 2011 Pilgrimage Committee Members

August 10, 2011

2011 Minidoka Pilgrimage Pictures

Posted in 2011 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka Pilgrimage, Uncategorized tagged , , , , , , , at 9:53 am by minidokapilgrimage

Here’s links to various sites where pictures from the 2011 Minidoka Pilgrimage have been posted!

Feel free to browse and use for your own personal usage but if you wish to use pictures for commercial purposes please contact us at: minidokapilgrimage@gmail.com for more information.

Ryan Kozu: https://picasaweb.google.com/103180039956765998297/MinidokaPilgrimage2011?authuser=0&feat=directlink

Eugene Tagawa:
Pilgrimage Group Photos: https://picasaweb.google.com/iiemuchi/2011MinidokaPilgrimageGroupPhotos?authkey=Gv1sRgCMiygPKPj7CudA#
Thursday: https://picasaweb.google.com/iiemuchi/PILGRIMAGEThursdayJune30?authkey=Gv1sRgCK–wvSopsLWkQE
Friday: https://picasaweb.google.com/iiemuchi/PILGRIMAGEFridayJuly1?authkey=Gv1sRgCM2A3_ul9efBAQ
Saturday Morning/Afternoon: https://picasaweb.google.com/iiemuchi/PILGRIMAGESaturdayA_2?authkey=Gv1sRgCMfH2czr8Pb8iwE
Saturday Evening: https://picasaweb.google.com/iiemuchi/PILGRIMAGESaturdayEveningJuly2?authkey=Gv1sRgCJ3w6ui20c_P_AE
Sunday: https://picasaweb.google.com/100930662448489700454/PILGRIMAGESundayJuly3?authkey=Gv1sRgCP_buMHU_ILYDw#

Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial Dedication

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Japanese American Incarceration, Uncategorized tagged , , , , , at 9:39 am by minidokapilgrimage

Photo by: Ryan Kozu

Fumiko Hayashida with her daughter Natalie Hayashida Ong

On Saturday, August 6, 2011 the names on the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial wall were officially dedicated.  The 276 foot stone and cedar wall, one foot for every Japanese American living on Bainbridge Island at the start of World War II, will commemorate and honor the strength and perseverance of the people involved — both those exiled and their island neighbors — and brings awareness of the powerful capacity of human beings and a nation to heal, forgive and care for one another.

For more news about the Memorial and/or the dedication, please check out the following links:

Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community: http://www.bijac.org/index.php?p=MEMORIALIntroduction

New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/06/us/06internment.html
Seattle Times:  http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2015841172_bainbridge07m.html
Seattle PI: http://www.seattlepi.com/local/article/Monument-dedicated-to-Bainbridge-Island-s-1751457.php
Kitsap Sun: http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/2011/aug/06/bainbridge-celebrates-completion-of-internment/
Komo News: http://www.komonews.com/news/local/127072643.html
King 5 News: http://www.king5.com/news/Bainbridge-Island-Internment-Memorial–127074378.html

Photo by: Ryan Kozu

June 7, 2011

Registration is still open!

Posted in 2011 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka Pilgrimage tagged , , , , , , , at 8:29 pm by rkozu

Even if you missed the early registration deadline on June 3, it’s still not too late to register for the 2011 Minidoka Pilgrimage!  We are still accepting registration forms for this year’s pilgrimage.  If you still want to come, please fill out a registration for now!

www.minidokapilgrimage.org/register.html

Tribute band remembers those in internment camps

Posted in Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka Swing Band tagged , , , , , at 8:25 pm by rkozu

http://www.king5.com/on-tv/Tribute-band-remembers-those-in-internment-camps-93028904.html

by SAINT BRYAN / Evening Magazine

Posted on May 6, 2010 at 8:33 PM

http://www.king5.com/v/?i=93028904

At the time, more than 100,000 Japanese Americans lived behind fences with barbed wire in internment camps. It is one of America’s most shameful chapters. But a Northwest tribute band vows never to forget. Named for the notorious Idaho internment camp, the Minidoka Swing Band pays tribute to the music that made life bearable.

The Nikkei Exclusion Memorial on Bainbridge Island is located on the site of the former Eagledale ferry dock. On March 30, 1942, 227 men, women and children – two-thirds of them American citizens – were forcibly removed from their homes, rounded up by US Army soldiers armed with rifles fixed with bayonets and boarded a ferry to Seattle. Find out more at www.bijac.org.

The Minidoka Swing Band performs about half a dozen times a year. They are coming up to Seattle in September to perform at the dedication of the Japanese American Veterans Wall. More at www.facebook.com.

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