February 24, 2015

2015 Minidoka Pilgrimage Press Release

Posted in 2015 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , , , , at 9:30 am by minidokapilgrimage

Press Release – For Immediate Release

2015 Minidoka Pilgrimage June 25 – June 28, 2015
Announcing the 13th Annual Minidoka Pilgrimage

Seattle, WA – February 24, 2015 –
The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee announces the 2015 pilgrimage dates are Thursday, June 25 through Sunday, June 28, 2015.

In 1942, almost 13,000 people of Japanese-ancestry living in Washington and Oregon, many of whom were American citizens, were removed from their homes and sent to a desolate “concentration camp” near Twin Falls, Idaho. This summer, the 13th pilgrimage will take place with former incarcerees, their families, and friends – from Seattle, Portland and across the nation – to the former Minidoka Camp in Idaho. This is an opportunity to learn, share memories, and ask questions about the Minidoka experience. Consider participating as a way to bring your family together and reconnect with friends. Participation is limited.

The Minidoka Pilgrimage officially begins in Twin Falls, Idaho on Thursday evening, June 25, for dinner. On Friday, this year will feature a full day of educational programming. On Saturday, the group tours the Minidoka National Park Site followed with small group discussions to learn and share experiences of the incarceration experience. On Sunday morning, we will conclude our pilgrimage with a commemorative closing ceremony at Minidoka National Park Site.

Pilgrimage Details
Registration forms and additional information for the pilgrimage can be found at www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

There are two different registration packages:
·       The Seattle/Bellevue package includes bus transportation from Bellevue, Washington to Twin Falls, Idaho. The registration fee is $400.00.

·       The Boise/Twin Falls Package requires participants to provide their own transportation to Twin Falls, Idaho. The price is $200.00. **There is a discount on both packages for children under 12 and seniors 75 years and older.

The registration fee includes meals and all activities during the pilgrimage. Lodging must be made by each participant. Please review the Hotel and Information document and the Registration Form for more information on Pilgrimage packages (Seattle and Twin Falls). This information can be found on the Minidoka Pilgrimage web site at: www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee is excited to once again offer a SENIOR SCHOLARSHIP for those who are over 80 years of age and were imprisoned in any of the American concentration camps during WWII. Please review the Senior Scholarship Registration Form to apply for the scholarship.

All forms and information can be found on the Minidoka Pilgrimage website at: www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

For other questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us at minidokapilgrimage@gmail.com.

For those who cannot access the forms and information by computer, please leave your name and address with Dale H Watanabe at 206-296-6260 and they can be mailed to you.

Contact: Dale H Watanabe
(206) 296-2156
watanad@seattleu.edu

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February 19, 2015

The day Japanese Americans lost their rights

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News tagged , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:15 pm by rkozu

http://seattletimes.com/html/opinion/2025728913_furugoriopedinternment19xml.html

Originally published February 18, 2015 at 6:02 PM | Page modified February 19, 2015 at 12:52 PM

Guest: The day Japanese Americans lost their rights

Gordon Hirabayashi believed the forced removal of 120,000 Japanese Americans was unconstitutional — and he went to prison for his belief, writes guest columnist Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori.

By Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori

Special to The Times

Thursday marks the 73rd anniversary of an American day of infamy. On Feb. 19, 1942, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which set in motion the forced removal of my family from our Auburn-area home, joining the exile of 120,000 Japanese Americans from the West Coast to American concentration camps.

My family was first forcibly removed in crowded, hot trains to Fresno, Calif., arriving at a stark place surrounded by barbed wire fences called Pinedale Assembly Center. A month later, we were transported by bus to the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Northern California.

Conditions were harsh at both locations. Crammed into open ceiling “apartments” no larger than 20 by 25 feet, no conversation or movement was private. Everyone was forced to adjust to a culturally uncomfortable reality of sharing everything from meals in mess halls to humiliating communal showers and latrines with no privacy dividers.

I was just 13, and my family kept me busy playing softball, reading Nancy Drew novels and enjoying music. Looking back, perhaps they wanted to distract me from thinking about my brother, Gordon Hirabayashi, who wasn’t with us. He was in prison.

Before our forced removal, the entire Pacific Coast was under a federally imposed curfew for Japanese Americans. Gordon was attending the University of Washington and he strongly believed that this curfew and Executive Order 9066 were unconstitutional.

Deliberately staying out past the curfew, Gordon turned himself in to police and demanded that he be arrested. The police officers knew Gordon and told him to go home, but he persisted and was arrested by the FBI, tried and found guilty of violating the curfew. With no transportation paid for by the government, Gordon refused to pay his own way to go to prison in Arizona, so he decided to hitchhike.

Gordon also refused to be sent to the concentration camps or serve in the military, spending nearly two years in different prisons while appealing his curfew verdict. Eventually in 1943, his case reached the U.S. Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled against him.

Gordon’s principled stand was both unusual and lonely. Hardly anyone stood up for civil rights in the 1940s like they did in the 1960s, and most people in the Japanese-American community — let alone the nation at large — disagreed with his views as being unpatriotic and criticized him for making things harder by “rocking the boat.”

Forty years after his Supreme Court verdict, the U.S. District Court in Seattle overturned Gordon’s conviction. Blockbuster evidence was uncovered that the federal government deliberately withheld important military documents from his Supreme Court case, disclosing that racial reasons and not military necessity were used to justify the exclusion and incarceration of Japanese Americans.

After the war, Gordon earned his master’s and doctorate degrees in sociology from the University of Washington, enjoyed a successful academic career and received many awards including our nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Among all of his accomplishments, I’m most proud of my brother for his courage to protest the unbridled use of power by our government during times of fear, war hysteria and racial prejudice, and, since Sept. 11, 2001, I suspect that Gordon wouldn’t mind if I added religious intolerance to that list.

Gordon died on Jan. 2, 2012. To ensure that his story lives on and inspires generations to come, our family is honored that the permanent Legacy of Justice installations of public art and interpretive elements will be the cornerstone of the mixed-use Hirabayashi Place project currently under construction in Seattle’s Chinatown International District.

“I never looked at my case as my own, or just as a Japanese-American case,” Gordon said in reference to his overturned conviction. “It is an American case, with principles that affect the fundamental human rights of all Americans.”

Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori is a charter member of the Hirabayashi Place Legacy of Justice Committee.

June 30, 2014

2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage Group Pictures

Posted in 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, Photos tagged , , , , , , , at 9:55 am by minidokapilgrimage

Here are some of the large group pictures from the 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage.
Photo Credit: Eugene Tagawa

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2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage Participants

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Everyone who was incarcerated in Camp

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Sanseis

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Yonsei/Gonsei

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Hapas

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2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee

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2014 Seattle Bus Riders

June 10, 2014

Minidoka: Memory and Survival Captured in Literary Works

Posted in 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Photos tagged , , , , , , , , at 8:17 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://www.iexaminer.org/2014/06/minidoka-memory-and-survival-captured-in-literary-works/

Minidoka: Memory and survival captured in literary works

STAN SHIKUMA JUNE 9, 2014

Minidoka War Relocation Center, Idaho, USA. Inside the coop store of block 30, 1943. • Photo by U.S. Department of the Interior

In 1942, almost 13,000 people of Japanese ancestry, many of whom were American citizens, were removed from their homes and sent to a desolate incarceration camp near Twin Falls, Idaho. Japanese Americans spent nearly three years incarcerated at Minidoka and other camps during World War II.  Today, the Minidoka site continues to hold a mixture of memories and strong emotions—feelings of denial, distrust, shame, and joy.

 —Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee

The memories won’t die and the legacy lives on in generations that never lived inside the barbed wire of Minidoka. This is due in large part to the work of groups like the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and Friends of Minidoka who continue to raise consciousness around the Japanese American concentration camp experience and the designation of Minidoka as a National Historic Site.

Credit is also due to the work of many authors, scholars, filmmakers, photographers and journalists who continue to research and write about the incarceration and removal, finding new details, new stories, and new connections that help keep the story alive and relevant to the present.

Two such works were recently published. One is a book by photojournalist Teresa Tamura and the other is a compilation of essays edited by historians Russell M. Tremayne and Todd Shallat.


Minidoka

Minidoka: An American Concentration Camp
By Teresa Tamura
Caxton Press, 2013

Tamura’s Minidoka chronicles the author’s own journey from a passive state of ignorance and embarrassment about Minidoka to a passionate desire to unearth and illuminate the history of the people and the place. As a photojournalist, she achieves this largely through the photos she takes of people, sites, and artifacts associated with Minidoka and the explanatory captions supplied.

Through her research, well documented in footnotes and bibliography, Tamura reveals several little known facts and provides a clear historic context. The author’s intro and a special essay by Mitsuye Yamada make fascinating reading, but the heart of the book lies in the black and white photographs taken by the author.

Tamura includes many voices in her book, providing us with the photos and perspectives of those who lived or worked in the camp; those who left Minidoka for school, work, the army or prison; those who were actually born in camp; and those who worked to keep the memories alive through organizing, teaching, speaking, writing, art, literature, and poetry. She gives a voice, a name, a face, and a historical backdrop to each portrait.


surviving_minidoka

Surviving Minidoka: The Legacy of WWII Japanese American Incarceration
Russell M. Tremayne and Todd Shallat, editors
Boise State University, 2013

In Surviving Minidoka, editors Tremayne and Shallat preserve 10 “essays and insights from the College of Southern Idaho’s annual Minidoka Civil Liberties Symposium. Contributors, in pictures and words, honor the enduring spirit of nidoto nai yoni: “let it not happen again.” (Tremayne, from An American Tragedy).

The pieces range from historical scholarly works like that of Professor Greg Robinson on Mixing the Races, to personal remembrances from artist Roger Shimomura and the late Frank Kitamoto, to reflections on specific topics or personalities like Anna Hosticka Tamura’s piece on Minidoka Gardens or Russell M. Tremayne’s piece on Nakashima woodworker. Interspersed throughout are poems and excerpts from the writings of Lawrence Matsuda, Mitsuye Yamada, Lawson Fusao Inada, and others.

Like any collection of writings by several authors, the leap from one essay to the next is sometimes wide, both in style and content. Taken as a whole, however, the 10 essays, punctuated with numerous ancillary photos and writings, create a nuanced picture of Minidoka concentration camp and of the social milieu in which it was created: early 20th century America.

Viewed side by side, Minidoka and Surviving Minidoka offer a stark contrast: one in muted black and white with a single narrative and author, the other a busy full-color volume with multiple viewpoints and far-ranging topics. Both, however, are artistically attractive, both apt to kindle some emotional response, each with a unique take on one of America’s ten concentration camps of WWII: Minidoka.

The 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage takes place from June 19 to 22. This 11th pilgrimage will take place with former incarcerees, their families, and friends—from Seattle, Portland and across the nation—to the former Minidoka Camp in Idaho. For more information, visit www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

March 23, 2014

Dr. Frank Kitamoto, 74, Japanese-American leader dies

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , , , at 9:09 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2023194344_kitamotoobit1xml.html

Dr. Frank Kitamoto, 74, Japanese-American leader dies

Dr. Frank Kitamoto, a leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese-American community, who spread awareness about Japanese internment camps, died of kidney and heart complications March 15 at a Seattle hospital. He was 74.

March 22, 2014

By Paige Cornwell
Seattle Times staff reporter

Frank Kitamoto sits next to a plaque at the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.
COURTESY THE KITAMOTO FAMILY, 2008
Frank Kitamoto sits next to a plaque at the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.

When Japanese Americans returned home after being incarcerated in internment camps during World War II, no one wanted to talk about their experiences. It was too painful. They wanted to move on.

Determined to ensure that what his community experienced would never happened again, Frank Kitamoto broke that silence.

Dr. Kitamoto, a dentist, was a leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese-American community, who spread awareness about Japanese internment camps, died March 15 at a Seattle hospital. He was 74.

He died of heart and kidney complications, according to his sister Lilly Kodama, of Bainbridge Island.

Frank Kitamoto was 2½ years old in 1942 when he, his mother and three sisters were sent to the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California after President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. His father had already been rounded up by the FBI for questioning; he joined the family later.

The Japanese Americans on Bainbridge Island were the first group in Washington to be taken to the internment camps, Dr. Kitamoto said during an interview with Idaho Public Television in 2007. The Kitamoto family stayed in Manzanar for 11 months, then they were transferred to Minidoka War Relocation Center in Idaho.

Dr. Kitamoto’s earliest memories were from the camps, so, he said, he didn’t know what he was missing then. Later, he realized how difficult it must have been for the adults. He remembered spit-wad fights with other children and getting trampled at the end of the Miss Minidoka contest. When he was 5, he stole cigarettes from his dad’s dresser and smoked the whole pack, he told the television interviewer. Afterward, he was sick for a week.

“But I did give up smoking when I was 5 years old,” he said. “I remember that.”

Dr. Kitamoto was 5 when his family returned to Bainbridge Island near the end of the war. He struggled with identity, said Gerald Elfendahl, who met him in the early 1980s when they worked together on an exhibit at the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum, where Elfendahl was the curator.

“After World War II, there was such a strong social pressure for the Japanese to assimilate and not share their culture,” Elfendahl said. “He didn’t think it was good to be Japanese,” Dr. Kitamoto told him.

That changed when Dr. Kitamoto realized the public needed to hear about their experiences, Kodama said. When he tried to interview those who had been interned, some members of the community viewed him as an “angry young man who was rocking the boat,” said Clarence Moriwaki, who met Dr. Kitamoto in 1998 when Dr. Kitamoto was president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community.

“There were 120,000 stories, and all their stories are different, “Moriwaki said. “Some have spent their whole time trying to forget it. Talking about it picks at that scab, and it’s painful. Frank did understand that, but he wanted to make sure that it didn’t happen again.”

Dr. Kitamoto worked with others to create an oral-history project, which he presented to students in Washington and across the nation. When Dr. Kitamoto’s exhibits and the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial were completed, the same men who initially had been opposed came forward, Kodama said.

“They told Frank they were sure glad he didn’t pay any attention to them,” Kodama said.

Dr. Kitamoto had a successful dental practice on Bainbridge Island. In his offices, there were rooms filled with heirlooms donated to him by Japanese-American families. It must have driven his wife, Sharon, crazy, Moriwaki said, but she also recognized how important the items were.

“The artifacts were all over the place, and yet he felt these were important to save,” Moriwaki said. “He knew those pieces weren’t junk, they were somebody’s story.”

In addition to his sister, Lilly, survivors include Dr. Kitamoto’s wife, Sharon, and son Derek, both of Bainbridge Island, and sister Frances Ikegami of Bremerton.

Funeral arrangements are pending.

Paige Cornwell: 206-464-2530 or pcornwell@seattletimes.com

March 20, 2014

2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage Press Release

Posted in 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Friends of Minidoka, Honor Roll, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , , , , at 9:02 am by minidokapilgrimage

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Press Release – For Immediate Release

2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage
June 19 – June 22, 2014

Announcing the 12th Annual Minidoka Pilgrimage and the 72nd Anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066

Seattle, WA – March 4, 2014

The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee announces the 2014 pilgrimage dates are Thursday, June 19 through Sunday, June 22, 2014.

Registration forms and additional information for the pilgrimage can be found at www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

There are two different registration packages:
• The Seattle/Bellevue package includes bus transportation from Bellevue, Washington to Twin Falls, Idaho. The registration fee is $385.00.
• The Boise/Twin Falls Package requires participants to provide their own transportation to Twin Falls, Idaho. The price is $185.00. **There is a discount on both packages for children and seniors 75 years and older. 

The registration fee includes meals and all activities during the pilgrimage. Lodging must be made by each participant. Please review the Hotel and Information document and the Registration Form for more information on Pilgrimage packages (Seattle and Twin Falls). This information can be found on the Minidoka Pilgrimage web site at www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

Pilgrimage Details 
In 1942, almost 13,000 people of Japanese-ancestry living in Washington and Oregon, many of whom were American citizens, were removed from their homes and sent to a desolate “incarceration camp” near Twin Falls, Idaho. This summer, the 12th pilgrimage will take place with former incarcerees, their families, and friends – from Seattle, Portland and across the nation – to the former Minidoka Camp in Idaho. This is an opportunity to learn, share memories, and ask questions about the Minidoka experience. Consider participating as a way to bring your family together and reconnect with friends. Participation is limited.

The Minidoka Pilgrimage officially begins in Twin Falls, Idaho on Thursday evening, June 19, for dinner. On Friday, this year will feature a full day of educational programming. On Saturday, the group tours the Minidoka National Park Site followed with small group discussions to learn and share experiences of the incarceration experience. On Sunday morning, we will conclude our pilgrimage with a commemorative closing ceremony at Minidoka National Park Site.

The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee is excited to once again offer a SENIOR SCHOLARSHIP for those who are over 80 years of age and were imprisoned in any of the American concentration camps during WWII. Please review the Senior Scholarship Registration Form to apply for the scholarship.

All forms and information can be found on the Minidoka Pilgrimage website at www.minidokapilgrimage.org.

For other questions or concerns, please feel free to contact us at minidokapilgrimage@gmail.com.

For those who cannot access the forms and information by computer, please leave your name and address with Dale H Watanabe at 206-296-6260 and they can be mailed to you.

Contact: Dale H Watanabe
(206) 296-6260
watanad@seattleu.edu

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March 18, 2014

Frank Kitamoto, longtime leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American community, passes away

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News tagged , , , , at 9:13 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://www.bainbridgereview.com/news/250672091.html

Frank Kitamoto, longtime leader of Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American community, passes away

Frank Kitamoto, then president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community, gives U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee and U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell a tour of the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial wall in June 2010.   - Brad Camp | Review file

Frank Kitamoto, then president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community, gives U.S. Rep. Jay Inslee and U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell a tour of the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial wall in June 2010. 

— Image Credit: Brad Camp | Review File

Frank Kitamoto, an iconic figure in Bainbridge Island’s Japanese American community, died Saturday, March 15. He was 74.

Kitamoto was a longtime dentist on Bainbridge Island but was better known for his work to preserve and share the history of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.

“He was kind of a giant to me,” said Clarence Moriwaki, who worked closely with Kitamoto as part of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community. “He had been an outspoken champion of human rights. He was my mentor and friend.”

Kitamoto and his family were among the 227 Bainbridge Japanese Americans to be taken from Bainbridge Island on March 30, 1942, and sent to internment camps.

The families from Bainbridge were the first of nearly 12,000 Japanese Washington residents to be taken to concentration camps under President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066. The Kitamotos and other islanders were in the initial wave because government officials feared their proximity to crucial U.S. naval bases in Puget Sound.

They had six days to pack up their lives. At the time, Frank Kitamoto was 2 1/2, and along with his mother, Shigeko, and three sisters, Jane, 9 months old, Frances, 5, and Lilly, 7, were first sent to the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California.

A famous photograph taken during the forced removal shows the family of five — his father had already been taken in by the FBI in early February, 1942 — waiting with their suitcases and Frank holding the one thing he was allowed to carry away, his rubber toy John Deere tractor, before their departure. The family was later moved to the Minidoka War Relocation Center in Jerome County, Idaho.

Kitamoto, who was born May 28, 1939, returned to Bainbridge Island after World War II.

In 1983, Kitamoto started an oral history project on the internment with Ron Nakata and John Sakai, and made repeated visits to classrooms across Washington state and beyond to talk about the history of Japanese Americans.

Plans for a memorial service have not yet been finalized.

“He touched many, many lives; not just on the Island but across the planet, and for kids yet to be born,” said Gerald Elfendahl, who worked with Kitamoto for more than 35 years on history and heritage projects.

“Frank was just a very, very special person,” Elfendahl said.

Moriwaki recalled the slideshow presentation that was put together by Kitamoto that discussed fear and racism. He was in high demand, Moriwaki said, and would travel for anyone who asked, often on his own dime.

For Moriwaki, one slide stuck with him. In it were the words, “The opposite of love isn’t hate, but fear.”

Kitamoto and Moriwaki’s shared passion for human rights is what began the mentorship, but it was Kitamoto’s commitment to sharing his experience while also connecting to others that, Moriwaki said, is what made him a friend.

In one instance, Kitamoto and Moriwaki traveled to visit a Japanese American memorial in Lac Du Bonnet, Canada.

It was Sept. 18, 2001, just a week after Sept. 11, but the two went anyway. They had hours in the car to speak.

“He had the biggest giving heart,” Moriwaki said.

“If you ever wanted to know where Frank was, all you had to do was listen,” Moriwaki said. “You would hear this big, hardy laugh.”

A former president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese Community — an organization he headed for more than 25 years — Kitamoto was named an Island Treasure in 2002 by the Bainbridge Island Arts and Humanities Council.

He was also honored with a Kitsap Human Rights Commissions Lifetime Achievement Award in 2008.

“He’d be the first person to say it’s nice, but it’s not about me. I’m just telling a story about others,” Moriwaki said.

His memories of life in the camps were a bit limited, Kitamoto later acknowledged, because of his young age.

“I remember playing in the sand around the barracks. I remember my cousin liking to eat sand and I don’t really know why but she always ate sand,” he said in an interview with Jim Peck for “The Idaho Homefront: Of Camps and Combat,” a program for Idaho Public Television.

“I was always getting into trouble. Memorable things – I know I took a pack of cigarettes from my dad’s dresser once and went into the barrack and smoked the whole pack and I was really sick for maybe a week or so but I did give up smoking when I was 5 years old. I remember that,” he said.

“I remember going to a Miss Minidoka contest and sitting in the front row and when the winner was announced everybody surged forward and trampled me into the gravel so I ended up in the hospital. That’s where they picked gravel out of me … I remember the older kids having ping-pong. I mean, having spit wad fights with rubber bands and paper that they rolled up into spit wads and they would tip the ping-pong tables over and shoot at each other and when they were out of ammunition they had us little kids run out there and pick up all the ammunition for the next round.”

This month, Bainbridge will commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the first forced removal of Japanese Americans in World War II at the Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.

Without Kitamoto there, Moriwaki said the ceremony will take on a very different tone.

“It’s a hole, a huge hole for the Japanese American community,” Moriwaki said.

March 8, 2014

2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage Youth Scholarships

Posted in 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , , , at 11:31 am by minidokapilgrimage

In an effort to continue to provide an experience of social justice in action, and to create diverse input, participation and energy, the Minidoka Pilgrimage Committee is proud to offer unique scholarship opportunities to students.

Student scholarship recipients are asked to assist with work activities before, and during, the 2014 Pilgrimage. All scholarship recipients are encouraged to be involved in the planning of subsequent Pilgrimages. The pilgrimage will be taking place this year from June 19- June 22.

Find the Scholarship form here: http://www.minidokapilgrimage.org/scholarships.html

Application deadline: Monday, April 14, 2014

The Scholarship Recipient will receive:
•Complimentary attendance to the 2014 Minidoka Pilgrimage. This includes transportation to and from Idaho from Seattle, registration costs, lodging, and all meals while attending the pilgrimage.
•The opportunity to serve on the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and to assist with the planning for future pilgrimages.

Eligibility and Expectations:
•Must be a student at least 18 years of age or graduated from college in the past one or two years. Undergraduate and graduate students can apply.
•Is able to participate for the entire pilgrimage trip from Thursday, June 19 – Sunday, June 22, 2014.
•Will assist the Minidoka Planning Committee with duties while attending the pilgrimage
•Is able to attend the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee meetings prior to the pilgrimage
•Will create a project of your interest relating to the Minidoka Pilgrimage. This project can either be educational, a way to document the pilgrimage, or a way to help the Pilgrimage Committee. Past projects include: video of the pilgrimage, picture show, and creating a Pilgrimage evaluation survey.

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2013 Minidoka Pilgrimage Youth Scholarship winners
Photo by: Ryan Kozu

February 25, 2014

2014 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Taiko Festival, Taiko Festival Pictures tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:52 am by minidokapilgrimage

Thank you to everyone who came out and supported this year’s Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival at Seattle University.  The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee wants to especially thank: UW Taiko Kai, Ringtaro and the School of Taiko, Okinawa Kenjin-Kai, Seattle Matsuri Taiko, Kaze Daiko and Seattle Kokon Taiko for participating in this year’s festival.

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January 28, 2014

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2014 Taiko Fundraiser

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Taiko Festival tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:07 am by minidokapilgrimage

Buy your tickets here at Brown Paper Tickets: 
http://dayofremembrancetaiko.bpt.me

DOR TAIKO 2014_F10Appr

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2014 Taiko Fundraiser

Seattle, WA – December 18, 2013 – In recognition of Japanese American Day of Remembrance and the 72nd anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and Seattle University are proud to present the Day of Remembrance 2014 Taiko Fundraiser on Sunday, February 23, 2014.  The event will open at Noon and the concert featuring taiko groups from throughout the Seattle area will begin at 1:00 p.m. Sunday, February 23rd in the Pigott Building on the campus of Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue in Seattle, WA.  Tickets are $20 general, $10 for students with ID and can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets, http://dayofremembrancetaiko.bpt.me.  Parking is provided at the Broadway Garage of Seattle University.  If attendees purchase tickets through Will Call, no actual tickets will be given, so please make sure to bring identification.  For those unable to purchase tickets on-line, they will be available at the International Student Center of Seattle University in the James C. Pigott Pavilion for Leadership.

A free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium directly outside the auditorium will open at Noon and will feature displays from the Law Library of Seattle University, National Park Service and the Minidoka National Historic Site, and the Seattle Nisei Veterans and Nisei Veterans Foundation.  Also featured will be original photographs in a collection called “My Minidoka” by Johnny Valdez y Uno.  Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

The concert benefits the annual Minidoka Pilgrimage to Twin Falls, Idaho.  This will be the 12th year of the Pilgrimage.  As one of the ten original War Relocation Authority (WRA) camps, the Minidoka National Historic Site is currently a part of the National Park Service and continues to be developed as an educational site.  Currently there is an original Mess Hall and Barrack at the site of Block 22, as well as an original Fire Station, Warehouse and Root Cellar.  Recent improvements include the Honor Roll, dedicated in 2011, which lists the names of approximately 1,000 individuals that enlisted from Minidoka and served in the army and 2014 will include the dedication of a restored guard tower at the entrance area.

The Day of Remembrance recognizes the date, February 19, 1942, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which forced 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents into concentration camps during World War II solely based upon their Japanese descent.

Sponsors of this event include: The International Student Center, the Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, Seattle University and the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

Dale H. Watanabe
watanad@seattleu.edu
Minidoka Pilgrimage Committee/Seattle University

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