February 19, 2015

2015 Day of Remembrance

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration tagged , , , , , at 6:32 pm by rkozu

redress-logo TN

73 years ago…EO 9066 was signed. Let us never forget. #minidoka#DayofRemembrance

The day Japanese Americans lost their rights

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News tagged , , , , , , , , , , , at 6:15 pm by rkozu

http://seattletimes.com/html/opinion/2025728913_furugoriopedinternment19xml.html

Originally published February 18, 2015 at 6:02 PM | Page modified February 19, 2015 at 12:52 PM

Guest: The day Japanese Americans lost their rights

Gordon Hirabayashi believed the forced removal of 120,000 Japanese Americans was unconstitutional — and he went to prison for his belief, writes guest columnist Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori.

By Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori

Special to The Times

Thursday marks the 73rd anniversary of an American day of infamy. On Feb. 19, 1942, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which set in motion the forced removal of my family from our Auburn-area home, joining the exile of 120,000 Japanese Americans from the West Coast to American concentration camps.

My family was first forcibly removed in crowded, hot trains to Fresno, Calif., arriving at a stark place surrounded by barbed wire fences called Pinedale Assembly Center. A month later, we were transported by bus to the Tule Lake Relocation Center in Northern California.

Conditions were harsh at both locations. Crammed into open ceiling “apartments” no larger than 20 by 25 feet, no conversation or movement was private. Everyone was forced to adjust to a culturally uncomfortable reality of sharing everything from meals in mess halls to humiliating communal showers and latrines with no privacy dividers.

I was just 13, and my family kept me busy playing softball, reading Nancy Drew novels and enjoying music. Looking back, perhaps they wanted to distract me from thinking about my brother, Gordon Hirabayashi, who wasn’t with us. He was in prison.

Before our forced removal, the entire Pacific Coast was under a federally imposed curfew for Japanese Americans. Gordon was attending the University of Washington and he strongly believed that this curfew and Executive Order 9066 were unconstitutional.

Deliberately staying out past the curfew, Gordon turned himself in to police and demanded that he be arrested. The police officers knew Gordon and told him to go home, but he persisted and was arrested by the FBI, tried and found guilty of violating the curfew. With no transportation paid for by the government, Gordon refused to pay his own way to go to prison in Arizona, so he decided to hitchhike.

Gordon also refused to be sent to the concentration camps or serve in the military, spending nearly two years in different prisons while appealing his curfew verdict. Eventually in 1943, his case reached the U.S. Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled against him.

Gordon’s principled stand was both unusual and lonely. Hardly anyone stood up for civil rights in the 1940s like they did in the 1960s, and most people in the Japanese-American community — let alone the nation at large — disagreed with his views as being unpatriotic and criticized him for making things harder by “rocking the boat.”

Forty years after his Supreme Court verdict, the U.S. District Court in Seattle overturned Gordon’s conviction. Blockbuster evidence was uncovered that the federal government deliberately withheld important military documents from his Supreme Court case, disclosing that racial reasons and not military necessity were used to justify the exclusion and incarceration of Japanese Americans.

After the war, Gordon earned his master’s and doctorate degrees in sociology from the University of Washington, enjoyed a successful academic career and received many awards including our nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Among all of his accomplishments, I’m most proud of my brother for his courage to protest the unbridled use of power by our government during times of fear, war hysteria and racial prejudice, and, since Sept. 11, 2001, I suspect that Gordon wouldn’t mind if I added religious intolerance to that list.

Gordon died on Jan. 2, 2012. To ensure that his story lives on and inspires generations to come, our family is honored that the permanent Legacy of Justice installations of public art and interpretive elements will be the cornerstone of the mixed-use Hirabayashi Place project currently under construction in Seattle’s Chinatown International District.

“I never looked at my case as my own, or just as a Japanese-American case,” Gordon said in reference to his overturned conviction. “It is an American case, with principles that affect the fundamental human rights of all Americans.”

Esther Toshiko Hirabayashi Furugori is a charter member of the Hirabayashi Place Legacy of Justice Committee.

January 9, 2015

2015 Day of Remembrance Taiko Fundraiser

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News, Taiko Festival tagged , , , , , at 1:46 pm by minidokapilgrimage

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Taiko Concert to Benefit Pilgrimage to Minidoka Incarceration Camp in Idaho
Seattle, WA – January 9, 2015

The Minidoka Pilgrimage and Seattle University are proud to present the Day of Remembrance 2015 Taiko Concert on Sunday, February 15, 2015.

The Taiko Concert will feature performances by several renowned taiko groups from the Seattle area.  Taiko refers to a traditional Japanese form of percussion using large barrel-shaped drums, dynamic playing styles, and choreographed movements. It is widely popular in Japanese American communities throughout the United States, and increasingly with youth groups.

A free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium, located directly outside the auditorium, will include displays about the Minidoka Pilgrimage, Seattle University, National Park Service and the Minidoka National Historic Site, and the Seattle Nisei Veterans Committee/NVC Foundation.  Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage.

The concert benefits the 13th annual Minidoka Pilgrimage from Seattle, Portland, and across the nation to Minidoka Incarceration Camp in southern Idaho. Minidoka was one of ten camps where Japanese Americans were imprisoned during World War II. Today, it is a unit of the National Park System and is developing into an educational site about civil liberties. The pilgrimage brings together former incarcerees, their families and friends, and those interested in learning more about the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II.  The pilgrimage offers a unique opportunity to hear and learn directly from those who experienced it firsthand.

The Day of Remembrance marks the 73rd anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 by Franklin D. Roosevelt which led to the mass incarceration.  The Day of Remembrance commemorates the injustices, race prejudice, hardships of 120,000 Japanese Americans who were imprisoned in concentration camps during World War II.

Date:  Sunday, February 15, 2015
Time:  Exhibit hall opens at 1:00pm, Concert begins at 2:00pm
Location: Seattle University – Pigott Auditorium, 901 12th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98122
Ticket Price: $20 General Admission
Tickets Available at:

  • Brown Paper tickets at: http://dayofremembrancetaiko2015.bpt.me/ Please bring identification for Will Call tickets, as no actual tickets will be provided.
  • International Student Center of Seattle University in the James C. Pigott Pavilion
  • Day of show at the Paccar Atrium, subject to ticket availability

Parking: Provided at the Broadway Garage of Seattle University.
Questions: minidokapilgrimage@gmail.com or 206-296-6260
Sponsors: Minidoka Pilgrimage, Seattle University International Student Center

 

November 6, 2014

Seattle woman in famous wartime photo dies

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, News tagged , , , , , at 11:31 am by minidokapilgrimage

http://www.seattlepi.com/local/article/Seattle-woman-in-famous-wartime-photo-dies-5874325.php

Seattle woman in famous wartime photo dies

Updated 12:09 pm, Thursday, November 6, 2014
Fumiko Hayashida holds 13-month-old daughter Natalie, while waiting board a ferry from Bainbridge Island to Seattle on March 30, 1942. They were among 227 Japanese Americans forced into interment camps during World War II under Executive Order 9066.  Photo: Seattlepi.com File/MOHAI, -
Fumiko Hayashida holds 13-month-old daughter Natalie, while waiting board a ferry from Bainbridge Island to Seattle on March 30, 1942. They were among 227 Japanese Americans forced into interment camps during World War II under Executive Order 9066. 
Photo: Seattlepi.com File/MOHAI, –

Seventy years ago, Fumiko Hayashida was a face in the crowd, one of 227 Japanese-Americans forced to leave Bainbridge Island during World War II. But as she awaited imprisonment with a baby in her arms, a news photographer took her picture.

That photo would later become an iconic wartime image, propelling Hayashida, then a modest farmer’s wife, into the limelight of civil rights activism.

“She was a nobody, but she was everybody,” said Hayashida’s daughter, K. Natalie Ong. It had been Natalie, then 13 months old, that Hayashida was holding the day their family was exiled.

“She represented everybody and what happened to Japanese-Americans.”

Hayashida died Sunday in Seattle. She was 103.

From farmer’s wife to living icon

Born on Bainbridge Island, Hayashida was the oldest living Japanese-American incarcerated from the island. Because they were near naval bases, the Bainbridge group was the first of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry detained under Executive Order 9066 in the country.

Most were U.S. citizens.

The government gave the Bainbridge group six days’ notice of their March 30, 1942 internment. Then 31 and pregnant, Hayashida wore all the clothes she could; boarded a ferry to Seattle; and then a train to Manzanar, an isolated desert camp in California. She was anxious and scared.

“It’s awful when you don’t know where you’re going, you don’t know long you’re going to stay,” Hayashida told the Seattle Post-Intelligencer in 2009. Her family later went to Minidoka in Idaho, spending a total of about three and half years in camps. She gave birth to her son Leonard. She had three kids under 5 while incarcerated.

When she and husband Saburo returned to Bainbridge, their strawberry fields had gone fallow. Many of their friends never returned to the island. He got a job at Boeing and they moved to Beacon Hill, where Hayashida raised three kids and lived for decades.

It had been a Seattle Post-Intelligencer photographer who took the photo, but a MOHAI staffer who identified her. The archivist had enlarged the photo and was able to read her internment tag.

By that time, Hayashida was an old woman. Her photo appeared in magazines and the Smithsonian. She quickly became a living icon, a survivor of wartime heartbreak.

“She wasn’t a political person, or an activist, but she relished that role,” said Ong, her daughter. “It really added an interesting dimension to her later life.”

‘I had a good life’

In her 90s, Hayashida joined the effort to get federal recognition for a Bainbridge site memorializing the internment. She testified before Congress, rolling down the halls in a wheelchair. At first, she was reluctant.

“She said, ‘Oh no, I can’t speak, I’m an old lady,'” recalled her friend Clarence Moriwaki, who had convinced her to testify.

“She nailed it,” he said. “She said, ‘I’m 95 years old, I’m an old woman, I hope I live long enough to see this memorial be recognized.'”

The Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial, of which Moriwaki is president, is now open to the public.

Earlier this year, Hayashida came out for Bainbridge’s annual New Year’s mochi-pounding festival. Crowds greeted the petite, white-haired centenarian with enthusiasm.

“I think the crowd clapping for her was louder than the taiko drums,” Moriwaki said.

Hayashida was vibrant in old age and didn’t dwell on the past. She preferred instead to root for her beloved Mariners, fill her house with frog figurines and play poker with girlfriends.

“This war was so long ago,” she told the P-I in 2009. “I’m proud of my life. I had a good life, not a perfect one. But nobody’s life is perfect. I have good family and good friends, and I feel so lucky.”

Hayashida is survived by sister Midori Yamasaki; daughter K. Natalie Ong and son Neal Hayashida; grandchildren Dennis Hayashida, Richard Hayashida, Kristine Hayashida Moore, Gary Ong and Paula Ong; five great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by husband Saburo Hayashida and son Leonard Hayashida.

The family has planned a celebration of her life on Nov. 16 in Seattle.

March 16, 2014

Remembering Dr. Frank Kitamoto

Posted in Bainbridge Island, Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News tagged , , , , at 10:00 am by minidokapilgrimage

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It is with great sadness that we share that we lost one of our committee members, Dr. Frank Kitamoto on March 15, 2014.  Frank was a young toddler when he, along with his family, were sent to Minidoka during World War II.  He shared the lessons of the incarcerations to: various school groups, community organizations, friends and just anyone who was willing to listen.  Frank was active not just on the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee, but also on the Friends of Minidoka Board and as President of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community Executive Board to just name a few.  He will be remembered for his relentless spirit and energy; and his never-ending passion for civil rights.  Frank, we thank you for your dedication to us and for all the work you did with the incarceration experience and sharing your story.  We will miss you greatly. Nidoto Nai Yoni

IMG_2488 2011 Pilgrimage Committee Members

February 25, 2014

2014 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Taiko Festival, Taiko Festival Pictures tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 8:52 am by minidokapilgrimage

Thank you to everyone who came out and supported this year’s Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival at Seattle University.  The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee wants to especially thank: UW Taiko Kai, Ringtaro and the School of Taiko, Okinawa Kenjin-Kai, Seattle Matsuri Taiko, Kaze Daiko and Seattle Kokon Taiko for participating in this year’s festival.

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January 28, 2014

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2014 Taiko Fundraiser

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Friends of Minidoka, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Minidoka Pilgrimage, News, Taiko Festival tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:07 am by minidokapilgrimage

Buy your tickets here at Brown Paper Tickets: 
http://dayofremembrancetaiko.bpt.me

DOR TAIKO 2014_F10Appr

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2014 Taiko Fundraiser

Seattle, WA – December 18, 2013 – In recognition of Japanese American Day of Remembrance and the 72nd anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and Seattle University are proud to present the Day of Remembrance 2014 Taiko Fundraiser on Sunday, February 23, 2014.  The event will open at Noon and the concert featuring taiko groups from throughout the Seattle area will begin at 1:00 p.m. Sunday, February 23rd in the Pigott Building on the campus of Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue in Seattle, WA.  Tickets are $20 general, $10 for students with ID and can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets, http://dayofremembrancetaiko.bpt.me.  Parking is provided at the Broadway Garage of Seattle University.  If attendees purchase tickets through Will Call, no actual tickets will be given, so please make sure to bring identification.  For those unable to purchase tickets on-line, they will be available at the International Student Center of Seattle University in the James C. Pigott Pavilion for Leadership.

A free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium directly outside the auditorium will open at Noon and will feature displays from the Law Library of Seattle University, National Park Service and the Minidoka National Historic Site, and the Seattle Nisei Veterans and Nisei Veterans Foundation.  Also featured will be original photographs in a collection called “My Minidoka” by Johnny Valdez y Uno.  Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

The concert benefits the annual Minidoka Pilgrimage to Twin Falls, Idaho.  This will be the 12th year of the Pilgrimage.  As one of the ten original War Relocation Authority (WRA) camps, the Minidoka National Historic Site is currently a part of the National Park Service and continues to be developed as an educational site.  Currently there is an original Mess Hall and Barrack at the site of Block 22, as well as an original Fire Station, Warehouse and Root Cellar.  Recent improvements include the Honor Roll, dedicated in 2011, which lists the names of approximately 1,000 individuals that enlisted from Minidoka and served in the army and 2014 will include the dedication of a restored guard tower at the entrance area.

The Day of Remembrance recognizes the date, February 19, 1942, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which forced 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents into concentration camps during World War II solely based upon their Japanese descent.

Sponsors of this event include: The International Student Center, the Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, Seattle University and the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

Dale H. Watanabe
watanad@seattleu.edu
Minidoka Pilgrimage Committee/Seattle University

January 14, 2013

2013 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka, Taiko Festival tagged , , , , , at 10:37 am by minidokapilgrimage

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Minidoka Pilgrimage 2013 Taiko Fundraiser

Seattle, WA – January 7, 2013 – In recognition of Japanese American Day of Remembrance and the 71st anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee and Seattle University are proud to present this year’s Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival 2013.  It will take place at 1:00 p.m. Sunday, February 17th at the Pigott Building on the campus of Seattle University, 901 12th Avenue in Seattle, WA.  Tickets are $20 general, $10 for students with ID and can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets, http://minidokataiko.brownpapertickets.com/.  If attendees purchase tickets through Will Call, no actual tickets will be given, so please make sure to bring identification.  For those unable to purchase tickets on-line, they will also be available at the JCCCW Office, 511 – 16th Ave. S., 206-568-7114 and at the Seattle University International Student Center.

A special free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium directly outside the auditorium will open at Noon and will feature the  display “Ancestry is not a Crime:  A Tribute to Gordon Hirabayashi” detailing his life and challenge of the incarceration and subsequent Coram Nobis case.  Also featured will be original photographs in a collection called “My Minidoka” by Johnny Valdez y Uno.  Raffle ticket sales and a general store will also be in the atrium to help support the work of the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee.

The taiko groups that are scheduled to perform are:  Seattle Matsuri Taiko, Inochi Taiko, Kaze Daiko, Ringtaro Tateishi School of Taiko, Seattle Kokon Taiko, Northwest Taiko, One World Taiko, Okinawa Kenjinkai Taiko (OKK), Stadium High School Taiko Club and Tacoma Fuji Taiko.  The program will conclude with a performance of all the groups together on stage.

The concert benefits the annual Minidoka Pilgrimage to Twin Falls, Idaho.  This will be the 11th year of the Pilgrimage.  As one of the ten original War Relocation Authority (WRA) camps, the Minidoka National Historic Site is currently a part of the National Park Service and continues to be developed as an educational site.  Currently there is an original Mess Hall and Barrack at the site of Block 22, as well as an original Fire Station, Warehouse and Root Cellar.  In addition, the Honor Roll listing the names of approximately 1,000 individuals that served in the army from Minidoka was dedicated in 2011.

The Day of Remembrance recognizes the date, February 19, 1942, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which forced 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents into concentration camps during World War II solely based upon their Japanese descent.

Sponsors of this event include: The International Student Center and Office of the President, Seattle University and the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Washington.  Parking at the Broadway Garage at Seattle University is being hosted by the Office of the President.

Contact:
Bif Brigman
bif@jcccw.org
Japanese Cultural & Community Center of Washington
206-568-7114

Dale Watanabe
watanad@seattleu.edu
Minidoka Pilgrimage Committee
206-296-6260

February 19, 2012

2012 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Minidoka Pilgrimage, Taiko Festival Pictures, Uncategorized tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 11:44 pm by minidokapilgrimage

Today marked the 70th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066.  As part of their Day of Remembrance Events, Seattle University hosted the 2012 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival.  Over 300 people attended this year’s event to hear the rhythmic beats of drumming and movement.  The Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee wants to thank: the School of Taiko, Inochi Taiko, Kaze Daiko, One World Taiko, Seattle Kokon Taiko, Northwest Taiko and the Okinawa Kenjin-Kai for participating in this year’s Taiko Festival.

Photo by: Ryan Kozu

February 1, 2012

2012 Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival

Posted in Day of Remembrance, Japanese American Incarceration, Taiko Festival Pictures tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , at 9:17 pm by minidokapilgrimage

Minidoka Pilgrimage Taiko Fundraiser

Seattle, WA – January 14, 2012 – In honor of Japanese American Day of Remembrance and the 70th anniversary signing of Executive Order 9066, the Minidoka Pilgrimage Planning Committee, Friends of Minidoka, and Seattle University are proud to present this year’s Day of Remembrance Taiko Festival 2012.  It will take place at 1:00 p.m. Sunday, February 19 at the Pigott Building, Seattle University, Broadway and E. Madison St. Tickets are $20.  They can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets, www.brownpapertickets.com/event/219585. If attendees purchase tickets through Will Call, no actual tickets will be given, so please make sure to bring identification.  For those unable to purchase tickets on-line, they will also be available at the JCCCW Office, 511 – 16th Ave. S., 206-568-7114 and at the Seattle University International Student Center.

A special free exhibit in the Paccar Atrium directly outside the auditorium will open at Noon and will feature a display honoring the Nisei recipients of the honorary degrees last year, a display from the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community and the National Park Service.  A light reception in the atrium will be sponsored by the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality.

The main speaker will be Yosh Nakagawa, with Dale Watanabe, as the MC.  Both are members of the Minidoka Pilgrimage Committee, which organizes the annual journey to Idaho.  This will be the 10th year of the Pilgrimage.  The Civil Liberties Symposium, a part of the 3-day trip, will be held at Boise State University. This year’s theme is “Children of the Camps.”

In conjunction with Seattle University’s Day of Remembrance, the taiko groups that are scheduled to perform are:  Inochi Taiko, Kaze Daiko, Ringtaro Tateishi School of Taiko, Northwest Taiko, Seattle Kokon Taiko, One World Taiko, Okinawan Taiko.  The event will also include several speakers who will focus on the various aspects of the Day of Remembrance and the Minidoka Pilgrimage.

The Day of Remembrance recognizes the date, February 19, 1942, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which forced 120,000 Japanese American citizens and legal residents into concentration camps during World War II solely based upon their Japanese descent.

Raffle tickets will also be sold for a chance to win an “iPad with Wi-Fi and 3G.” Cost is $10 per ticket, and will be available from Committee members and at the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Washington (JCCCW).  Winner need not be present to win.  Proceeds will go to support the Minidoka Pilgrimage.

Sponsors of this event include: The Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, International Student Center and Office of the President, Seattle University and the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Washington.

Contact:
Bif Brigman
bif@jcccw.org
JCCCW
(206) 568-7114

Ann F. Lindwall
fujiilindwall@comcast.net
Minidoka Pilgrimage Comm.
(206) 367-8749